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LIVING WILLS

1.  WHAT IS A LIVING WILL?

  • IT IS A TYPE OF ADVANCE DIRECTIVE.
  • IT IS A WRITTEN LEGAL DOCUMENT.
  • IT IS THE DOCUMENT TO WRITE OUT WHAT YOU DO AND DO NOT WANT IN TERMS OF MEDICAL CARE IF YOU ARE UNABLE TO SPEAK FOR YOURSELF.
2.  WHAT DOES A LIVING WILL PROVIDE?
  • DESCRIBES THE TYPES OF MEDICAL TREATMENTS OR LIFE-SUSTAINING TREATMENTS YOU WOULD WANT IF YOU WERE SERIOUSLY OR TERMINALLY ILL.
  • COMMUNICATES YOUR WISHES TO FAMILY, FRIENDS AND HEALTHCARE PROFESSIONALS.
  • AVOIDS CONFUSION CONCERNING YOUR HEALTHCARE DECISIONS.
3.  DO I NEED A LAWYER TO PREPARE A LIVING WILL?
  • IT IS NOT REQUIRED THAT AN ATTORNEY PREPARE THIS DOCUMENT.
  • FORMS ARE AVAILABLE ON THE INTERNET.
  • CONTACT YOUR LOCAL HOSPITAL.
  • WRITE YOUR OWN WISHES.
4.  WHO SHOULD RECEIVE COPIES OF MY LIVING WILL?
  • YOUR DOCTOR
  • HOSPITAL
  • FAMILY MEMBERS
  • HEALTHCARE POWER OF ATTORNEY, IF YOU APPOINT ONE.

NATIONAL AND LOCAL NEWS WARN ABOUT NEW LAUNDRY DETERGENT POISONING IN CHILDREN.

New laundry detergent pods, that may look like candy or toys, have been associated with a number of poisonings ini children across the country.  These pods may cause rapid and severe syptoms and require specific intervention that may be different than the typical recommendations such as inducing vomiting.  If a child is suspected of ingesting these pods immediately call the Poison Center at 800-222-1222.  Fortunately, the word is out and a number of news stations have covered this story including KMTV in Omaha and ABC News.  Additional prevention tips are available in a press release by the Regional Poison Control Center.

The website will provide you with a wide array of safety alerts, medication error reports, articles, information about medications  and medication identification resources. The website provides useful medication safety tools, an insulin safety center, patient information sheets on high-alert type medications, videos on safety topics, and a system for consumers to report medication errors to ISMP (Institute for Safe Medication Practices) and the US Food and Drug Administration. Go to Consumer Medication Safety webpage   www.consumermedsafety.org



EXTRA HELP WITH MEDICARE PRESCRIPTION DRUG PLAN COSTS
 
Do you have a Medicare Prescription Drug Plan?
If you have a Medicare Prescription Drug Plan, do you need extra help to pay for the monthly premiums, annual deductibles and copayments related to that Medicare Prescription drug plan?
 
How can you get the EXTRA HELP? You must complete and submit an Application for Extra Help.
·         Apply online at www.socialsecurity.gov/extrahelp;
·         Call Social Security at 1-800-772-1213 (TTY 1-800-325-0778) to apply over the phone or to request an application; or
·         Apply at your local Social Security office.
 
Who should complete an Application for Extra Help with Medicare Prescription Drug Plan costs?
·         You have Medicare Part A (Hospital Insurance) and/or Medicare Part B (Medical Insurance; and
·         You live in one of the 50 states or the District of Columbia.
 
Do not complete an Application if you have Medicare and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) or Medicare and Medicaid because you automatically will get the extra help.
 
For more information about Medicare Savings Prescription, call 1-800-MEDICARE (1-800-486-2048) or visit www.medicare.gov and click on Get Extra Help with Prescription Drug Costs.

  

Colonoscopy education

What is colorectal cancer?

Colorectal cancer develops in the colon or the rectum. The colon and rectum are parts of the digestive system, also called the gastrointestinal, or GI, system. The digestive system processes food for energy and rids the body of solid waste (fecal matter or stool).

After food is chewed and swallowed, it travels through the esophagus to the stomach. There it is partially broken down and sent to the small intestine, where digestion continues and most of the nutrients are absorbed. The word “small” refers to the diameter of the small intestine, which is smaller than that of the large intestine. The small intestine is actually the longest part of the digestive system – about 20 feet in length. Cancer occurs infrequently in the small intestine.

The small intestine joins the large intestine in the lower right abdomen. The small and large intestine are sometimes called the small and large bowel. The first and longest part of the large intestine is the colon, a muscular tube about 5 feet long. Water and mineral nutrients are absorbed from the food matter in the colon. Waste (feces) left from this process passes into the rectum, the final 6 inches of the large intestine, and is then expelled from the anus.

Colorectal cancer usually develops slowly over a period of 10 to 15 years. The tumor typically begins as a noncancerous polyp. A polyp is a growth of tissue that develops on the lining of the colon or rectum that can become cancerous. Colorectal cancer can be prevented by removing precancerous polyps, which can be present in the colon for as many as 10 years before invasive cancer develops. When colorectal cancer is found early and treated, the 5-year relative survival rate is 90%. Because screening rates are low, less than 40% of colorectal cancers are found early.

Early detection is the best prevention. Colorectal cancer is the third leading cause of death from cancer. It’s also one of the most preventable and curable cancers – if detected early. More than 90 percent of all colorectal cancers are diagnosed in people 50 or older. It is recommended that persons schedule a screening colonoscopy at age 50. You may be at an increased risk for developing colorectal cancer if you have a close relative who has or had colorectal cancer or polyps, or if you have a personal history of colorectal cancer, polyps or inflammatory bowel disease. Those who are at a greater risk for the development of colorectal cancer may need to be screened earlier and/or more frequently. If you feel you’re at a greater risk, talk with your physician about the proper screening program for you.

Colorectal cancer screening remains underused, despite the availability of effective screening tests. Screening for colorectal cancer lags far behind screening for breast and cervical cancers. As many as 60% of deaths from colorectal cancer could be prevented if everyone age 50 and older were screened regularly.

Please contact your primary care physician or Jayce Linse RN, BSN, Surgery Supervisor to schedule your screening colonoscopy.

Current Recommendations for the Prevention of Colorectal Cancer:

1.  Get Screened Regularly.
2.  Maintain a Healthy Weight Throughout Life.
3.  Adopt a Physically Active Lifestyle.
4.  Consume a Healthy Diet with an emphasis on plant sources, specifically:
     Choose foods and beverages in amounts that help achieve and maintains a healthy weight.
     Eat 5 or more servings of a variety of fruits and vegetables daily.
     Choose Whole Grains in preference to processed (refined) grains.
     Limit your consumption of processed and red meats.
5.  If you drink alcholic beverages, limit consumption.

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